Trinity United Methodist Church
Spartanburg, South Carolina

Robert I. Coulter - Organbuilders

Opus 7 / III - 26 / 2009
M.P. Moller Opus 10759

Turner Trumpet

The 8' Turner Trumpet being voiced in our Atlanta workshop.

Great Organ

Manual II (CC-c4)

16' Lieblich Gedeckt (SW)
8' Open Diapason
8' Bourdon
4' Octave
2' Super Octave (from POS)
IV - Mixture
8' Turner Trumpet (hooded, New)
8' Minor Trumpet (SW)

Pedal Organ


32' Resultant (New)
16' Diapason
16' Lieblich Gedeckt (SW)
8' Octave (ext)
8' Chimney Flute (SW)
4' Choral Bass (ext)
4' Chimney Flute (SW)
16' Double Trumpet (SW, ext)
8' Turner Trumpet (GT)
8' Minor Trumpet (SW)
4' Clarion (SW)

Swell Organ

Manual III (CC-c4) / Enclosed

16' Lieblich Gedeckt
8' Gemshorn
8' Gemshorn Celeste (cO)
8' Chimney Flute
4' Principal
4' Flute (New ext)
2' Flautino
III - Fourniture
8' Minor Trumpet

Positiv Organ

Manual I (CC-c4)

8' Wood Gedeckt
4' Koppel Flute
2' Block Flute (from GT)
III - Sharp Mixture
8' Krummhorn
8' Turner Trumpet (GT)

Beginning in 2008, we were asked by Organist/Choirmaster Justin Addington to care for the 1988 Moller pipe organ installed at Trinity United Methodist Church. Upon our first inspections of the instrument, we found it to be in good mechanical condition, but with rough, and uneven voicing.

With input from Mr. Addington, we devised a plan to remedy the voicing of the existing instrument, while also making a few tonal revisions and the addition of a hooded, 8' Festival Trumpet. In our work, we will relocate a few stops, while adjusting the balance within the Mixtures and voicing the Great Principal chorus in the rich, graceful manner our organs are becoming known for.

The new 8' Turner Trumpet will serve as the Solo voice for this instrument. These pipes are built to our exacting specification, and feature hooded resonators to properly project the tone into the church. They also feature our custom shallot schedule to allow for the maximum rich, fundamental tone, while still retaining power sufficient to serve as a solo voice against the full Great Principal chorus. In our instruments, we do not feel the solo reed should obliterate the full organ ensemble, but rather serve as a solo against the Great chorus, but also serve as the last ensemble voice when added to full organ. In this way, these voices are never too loud, nor too brash, but rather enhance many musical situations.

Turner Trumpet